The Lumberyard
Shape the top of the stern (click to open/close)
First thing to be done is to shape the top of the stern. The plans show the shape but the builder can give the top a little more or less shape according to his liking.
Using a sander to shape the top of the stern (click to open/close)
Once again the home made disk sander on the Dremel was used to shape the top of the stern.
Tracing the stern's shape to create the transom rail (click to open/close)
When your satisfied with the top of the stern a tracing is made of the shape, then it is transferred to the edge of a piece of 1/4 inch thick sheet stock. The transom rail is made the same way the lower molding was made. The rail bends side to side as well as curves from front to back. Like the molding, it is quite impossible to bend a rail in two directions, so like the molding the rail is carved to shape. Starting with a piece of wood about 1/4 thick and 1/2 wide and longer than the stern, carve the arc of the rail. First carve the inside shape until it sits nice and flush on the stern. Then carve the upper side until the rail is 1/8 thick.
Trace the curve of the stern on the rail piece (click to open/close)

Trace the curve of the stern on to the rail piece.
Cut the rail 3/8 wide (click to open/close)
Cut the rail about 3/8 wide.
Place rail on stern, and notice overlap (click to open/close)
Placing the rail on the stern there should be a small overlap and enough room on the inside to cover the inside stern planking.
Adjust the top of stern and transom rail (click to open/close)
Keep adjusting the top of the stern and the transom rail until the ends of the rail sit on top of the counter timbers. The rail will extend slightly beyond the counter timbers when cut off, also the cap rail will sit below the transom rail.

Go to part 27- WALES

return to list of instruction pages

Home | Wood | Ship Kits | Articles | Cannons | Shop On-line | About Us | Videos

 

6908 Stadium Drive • Brecksville, OH 44141 • 440.526.2173
mrs22wood@aol.combodyplan@aol.com

©2016 The Lumberyard for Model Shipwrights